Tag Archives: rock

WTF: Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 2020

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So, here are the folks who will be enshrined in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame class of 2020:

  • Depeche Mode
  • The Doobie Brothers
  • Whitney Houston
  • Nine Inch Nails
  • The Notorious B.I.G.
  • T. Rex

UnknownI’ve argued for the The Doobie Brothers in the past — so, right on! Go, Doobie Brothers! And I love Nine Inch Nails (for inspiring Johnny Cash alone), the Notorious B.I.G. (a seminal hip-hop godfather) and T. Tex (so much love for Marc Bolan’s groovy, grungy, proto-New Wave guitar sound) “Get It On”, etc., though he had only a few giant Top-40 hits.

But Whitney Houston and Depeche Mode? Really? Rock & Roll?

Did Whitney Houston — as prodigious a vocal instrument as she possessed — record a single rock and roll track? Did she chart a single rock & roll single? Did she ever rock?

How in the hell is Whitney Houston a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?

Let’s put it this way. Is Ella Fitzgerald in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame? Ella won 13 Grammy awards and sold over 40 million albums — but she was a jazz singer — not a rock & roll singer. She’s not in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

Soulful, bluesy, risk-taking jazz singer Billie Holiday is in the Hall as a bold and fearless, raw and soulful early influence — but slick, pop-oriented Whitney Houston hardly qualifies. Especially when more deserving rockers have been, once again, overlooked.

There is a national shame and outrage that I must address here and now…

Tommy+James++The+Shondells+732311_356x237Why — oh why? — aren’t Tommy James & The Shondells in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?

I’m a Cleveland boy, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is a shining jewel on my hometown lakefront — but that only makes such an injustice a more personal matter.

2014-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-ceremony-1024Tommy James & The Shondells have been waiting since 1991 to get a call from the Hall. For 29 years, they’ve had to endure the enshrinement of acts like Abba, Kiss and Whitney in an institution supposedly devoted to rock and roll – while the band that gave garage bands worldwide rock classics like “Mony Mony” and “Hanky Panky” is continually and criminally passed over.

Tommy James GERHow can it be that overproduced purveyors of techno pop-rock (Depeche Mode) and pure, chart-topping pop (Whitney Houston) win out over the inspired 60’s rockers who put “I Think We’re Alone Now” and “Crimson and Clover” down on vinyl?

At the 2014 Hall of Fame induction ceremony, Rage Against the Machine’s lead guitarist Tom Morello – a man whose shredding virtuosity and politics I admire – made a convincing case for why Kiss had a rightful place in the Rock Hall. But while Kiss may have blazed a trail for visual and musical bombast and pyro in arena rock – their sound and fury signify nothing like the string of hits that Tommy James and his band delivered in the late 1960s.

tommy-james-and-the-shondells-on-the-ed-sullivan-showBesides their two #1 hit single in the U.S. – “Hanky Panky” in ’66 and “Crimson and Clover” in ’69 — Tommy James & The Shondells charted twelve other Top 40 hits, including five in the top ten. Remember a platter entitled “Crystal Blue Persuasion”?

How about 14 Top 40 hits during the greatest period in rock and roll radio history? All while competing with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, Creedence Clearwater Revival, James Brown, Sly & The Family Stone – and those Motown artists cranking out classics in Hitsville, USA.

All of those great rockers are in the Hall of Fame — so, why not Tommy James & The Shondells?

114774938And I don’t want to hear that Tommy James was “bubblegum”. Please. When was the last time you listened to “Mony Mony” or “Draggin the Line”? Guitars. Groove. Harmony. Drive. Horns. Hooks. Lots and lots of classic rock and roll hooks.

Tommy James & The Shondells should go into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fames very next class or the whole institution is a sham.

TommyJames2Honor Tommy James while the man is still alive and well and rocking.

I can wait no longer.

I’m just going to enshrine Tommy James & The Shondells here and now.

In fact…

I’m announcing The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2021 must include Tommy James & The Shondells — Eligible since 1991. And now about…

The Monkees — Eligible since 1991

The-Monkees-the-monkees-29786398-886-960Not even gonna argue about this.

The Monkees should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Hell, The Beatles respected The Monkees – so why should anyone else deny their undeniable greatness?

Morons who I have little patience for say The Monkees were a fabricated band – “The Pre-Fab Four” — surrounded by studio musicians. I know for a fact that The Beach Boys, The Mamas & The Papas, and others in the Hall of Fame were backed by the very same group of studio cats: the Wrecking Crew. So, what? I said I wasn’t gonna argue.

websbest060113_fullsize_story1At their peak in ‘67, The Monkees outsold The Beatles and Rolling Stones combined. 12 Top-40 hits, three #1 hits — and a TV show that brought melodic, witty, well-written and beautifully sung rock and roll music (and surprisingly subversive comedy) into homes across America.

The-Monkees-the-monkees-2846004-603-546I won’t even mention the songs by name. You know them. You sing them. You’ll probably hear one on the radio today.

“Last Train to Clarksville,” “I’m a Believer,” “Daydream Believer,” “Pleasant Valley Sunday” and “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone”. That’s just five.

And now I’m really not gonna argue any more.

The Rock N Roll Trio — Eligible since 1981

115163945Johnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio were the best damn rockabilly band that ever thumped a standup bass, whacked out the backbeat on a snare, and sang like drunken wildcats.

“Rock Billy Boogie”, “Rock Therapy”, “Train Kept A-Rollin”, “Honey Hush”, “Tear It Up” – Johnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio served up fundamental, elemental, essential rock and roll.

20131210092007-burnette_jJohnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio featured no frills, no gimmicks, no costumes, and no pyrotechnics — other than the fire they produced by their passionate playing.

Sorry, Depeche Mode, this is rock and roll with real, gritty, driving heart and soul. I don’t give a damn what hits they had or where they charted. When I need rock therapy — they give it to me.

They should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

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Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2015

RR Banner 2RR BannerI know there’s a lot going on right now in Iraq and Syria and the Ukraine and Gaza and Ferguson, Missouri – but there’s not much I can do about those intractable geopolitical situations. I’ll let prudent, deliberative President Obama and his national security team sort out America’s proper role in all that madness.

But there is one source of national shame and outrage that I must address here and now…

Tommy+James++The+Shondells+732311_356x237Why aren’t Tommy James & The Shondells in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame?

I’m a Cleveland boy, and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is a shining jewel on our downtown lakefront — but that only makes such an injustice a more personal matter.

2014-rock-and-roll-hall-of-fame-ceremony-1024Tommy James & The Shondells have been waiting since 1991 to get that call from the Hall. For 23 years, they’ve had to endure the enshrinement of acts like Abba, Donna Summer and Madonna in an institution supposedly devoted to rock and roll – while the group that gave garage bands around the world rock classics like “Mony Mony” and “Hanky Panky” is continually and criminally passed over.

Tommy James GERHow can it be that slick, overproduced purveyors of disco and pop take precedence over the guys who put “I Think We’re Alone Now” and “Crimson and Clover” down on vinyl?

At this year’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony, Rage Against the Machine’s lead guitarist Tom Morello – a man whose shredding virtuosity and politics I admire – made a convincing case for why Kiss had a rightful place in the Rock Hall. But while Kiss may have blazed a trail for visual and musical bombast and pyro in arena rock – their sound and fury signify nothing like the string of hits that Tommy James and his band delivered in the late 1960s.

tommy-james-and-the-shondells-on-the-ed-sullivan-showBesides their two #1 hit single in the U.S. – “Hanky Panky” in ’66 and “Crimson and Clover” in ’69 — Tommy James & The Shondells charted twelve other Top 40 hits, including five in the top ten. Remember a platter entitled “Crystal Blue Persuasion”?

How about 14 Top 40 hits during the greatest period in rock and roll radio history? All while competing with The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Who, The Kinks, Creedence Clearwater Revival, James Brown, Sly & The Family Stone – and those Motown artists cranking out classics in Hitsville, USA.

All of those great rockers are in the Hall of Fame — so, why not Tommy James & The Shondells?

114774938And I don’t want to hear that Tommy James was “bubblegum”. Please. When was the last time you listened to “Mony Mony” or “Draggin the Line”? Guitars. Groove. Harmony. Drive. Horns. Hooks. Lots and lots of classic rock and roll hooks.

Tommy James & The Shondells should go into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fames very next class or the whole institution is a sham.

TommyJames2Honor Tommy James while the man is still alive and well and rocking.

I can wait no longer.

I’m just going to enshrine Tommy James & The Shondells here and now.

In fact…

I’m announcing The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2015 (if there were any justice in this freaking world):

Tommy James & The Shondells — Eligible since 1991

Chicago — Eligible since 1994.

cover_3548181012011_rActually, the Chicago that most deserves to go into the Rock Hall is the first incarnation of Chicago. The first version of Chicago was the band that was politically progressive and rocked harder than the late 70s and 80’s version – before their bluesy lead guitarist, Terry Kath died in January 1978 from an accidentally self-inflicted gunshot wound. (Some say Russian roulette.)

That was the band that got me out to Blossom Music Center during my high school days to enjoy some of the first rock concerts I ever attended.

2013-1-30-terry_kath_3-533x402My favorite Chicago song during this period was “Dialogue (Part I & II) – a charged musical debate between a politically active guy (sung by Kath) and an apathetic college student (sung by Peter Cetera). Listening to that song now makes we weep for the current state of music on the radio. Remember that chorus? “We can make it happen…”

peter-cetera-64_smallAfter Kath died, Chicago lost currency with me because of the band’s over-reliance on Peter Cetera’s often-cheesy (but enormously popular) ballads.

The same thing happened to another Chicago band, Styx, when Dennis DeYoung’s ballads became hits – and smothered the rock in syrup. But the chicks dug it. And the arenas filled up.

Terry-Kath-ChicagoNo American band besides The Beach Boys had as many hit singles and albums on the Billboard charts as Chicago.

In fact, Chicago had more hit singles in the US during the 1970s than anyone else.

And they scored five #1 albums and 21 top-ten singles.

Put ‘dose Chicago boys in ‘da Hall.

The Doobie Brothers — Eligible since 1996:

the_doobie_brothersI remember with great humility the day in 1972 when my fellow Cleveland Central Catholic freshman (and soon to be band mate) Ed Dougan and I were discussing The Doobie Brother’s first big hit, “Listen to the Music”. I opined that The Doobie Brothers sounded like a one-hit-band to me.

For the next four years, The Doobie Brothers gave Eddie Dougan reason after reason to remind me how absolutely wrong I was – as songs like “Jesus is Just Alright”, “Long Train Running” and “China Grove” poured out of our radios and rocked up the charts, culminating in their inescapable, utterly sing-able #1 hit, “Black Water”.

22754_lgI graduated from high school in ’76. That same year, Michael McDonald became an official member of The Doobie Brothers – and led them to another string of soulful hits.

With McDonald singing lead, songs like “Takin’ It to the Streets” and “What a Fool Believes”, topped the charts in the US – and made Eddie Dougan smile once again, remembering what a fool I was.

Green Day — Eligible in 2014

Green Day should be first ballot Hall of Famers.greenday2_2319069b

If Green Day isn’t drummed into the Hall at its 2015 Induction Ceremony, then the whole building should just slink shamefully into Lake Erie.

e28880d04d9bbe6ae819a3f04dba1256-jpgLong before “American Idiot” exploded into the Zeitgeist, Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt and Tre Cool had already established themselves as the primary punks of the new millennium.

Green Day has sold more than 75 million albums and singles worldwide. There’s no reason to wait.

Put those punks in the Hall.

If these next two deserving honorees continue to be snubbed by the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame – Southern Californians and fans of surf rock should get Eric Von Zipper to bust some heads.

Jan & Dean — Eligible since 1985

jan-deanWithout Jan and Dean there are no Beach Boys. It’s as simple as that. Beginning in the late 1950s, Jan Berry and Dean Torrence established much of what became the California surf rock sound, featuring big waves, hot rods, and girls, girls, girls.

Brian Wilson looked up to Jan – who was a studio production whiz kid – as a musical big brother. And that’s Dean’s falsetto on the Beach Boy’s party classic, “Barbara Ann”. (Carl Wilson says, “Thanks, Dean” at the end of the track.) Jan & Dean were cool. So cool they were chosen as the hosts of the legendary T.A.M.I. Show in 1964.

Jan BerrySadly, Jan & Dean’s hit-making ended in the spring of ’66 when Jan drove his Corvette into the back end of a parked gardener’s truck in Beverly Hills and sustained severe head injuries.

Shades of “Dead Man’s Curve”.

jan-and-dean-ride-the-wild-surf-1964-3From their first hit, “Jennie Lee” in ’58 to their last, “Popsicle” in ’66 – Jan & Dean charted 15 Top 40 hits, including 6 in the Top 10.

“Little Old Lady from Pasadena” went to #3 – and “Surf City” — the joyous anthem of surf rock — went all the way to #1 promising “two girls for every boy”.

Two girls for every boy? That’s reason enough to put Jan & Dean in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

And do it while 74-year old Dean can still get onstage and sing.

Dick Dale — Eligible since 1987

properleftyDick Dale is the The King of the Surf Guitar. He pioneered the surf music style, experimenting with reverb – and worked with Leo Fender to push the limits of electric amplification. (Riffmaster Van Wagner owes Dick Dale an unpayable debt for producing “thick, clearly defined tones” at “previously undreamed-of volumes.”

And it wasn’t just upping the volume in rock and roll that makes Dick Dale Hall-worthy – it’s also his style and technique. Just spin “Let’s Go Trippin’” – often called the first surf rock song – or “Jungle Fever” or “Misirlou”.

Dick DaleDick Dale’s records may not have been big on the national charts – but their influence was both immediate and far-reaching.

Like Chuck Berry before him, generations of guitar shredders copied Dick Dale’s licks.

Dick-DaleYou can put him in as a performer or an early influence – or for lifetime achievement – but The King of the Surf Guitar should be enthroned in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

And it should be done while Dick Dale can still perform — thrilling us with his pioneering sound.

The Monkees — Eligible since 1991

The-Monkees-the-monkees-29786398-886-960Not even gonna argue about this.

The Monkees should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Hell, The Beatles respected The Monkees – so why should anyone else deny their undeniable greatness?

Morons who I have little patience for say The Monkees were a fabricated band – “The Pre-Fab Four” — surrounded by studio musicians. I know for a fact that The Beach Boys, The Mamas & The Papas, and others in the Hall of Fame were backed by the very same group of studio cats: the Wrecking Crew. So, what?

Hold on. I said I wasn’t gonna argue.

websbest060113_fullsize_story1At their peak in ‘67, The Monkees outsold The Beatles and Rolling Stones combined. 12 Top-40 hits, three #1 hits — and a TV show that brought melodic, witty, well-written and beautifully sung rock and roll music (and surprisingly subversive comedy) into homes across America.

The-Monkees-the-monkees-2846004-603-546I won’t even mention the songs by name. You know them. You sing them. You’ll probably hear one on the radio today.

Okay…

“Last Train to Clarksville,” “I’m a Believer,” “Daydream Believer,” “Pleasant Valley Sunday” and “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone”. That’s just five.

And now I’m really not gonna argue any more.

The Rock N Roll Trio — Eligible since 1981

115163945Johnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio were the best damn rockabilly band that ever thumped a standup bass, whacked out the backbeat on a snare, and sang like drunken wildcats.

“Rock Billy Boogie”, “Rock Therapy”, “Train Kept A-Rollin”, “Honey Hush”, “Tear It Up” – Johnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio served up fundamental, elemental, essential rock and roll.

20131210092007-burnette_jJohnny Burnette and the Rock & Roll Trio featured no frills, no gimmicks, no costumes, and no pyrotechnics — other than the fire they produced by their passionate playing.

Sorry, Kiss, this is rock and roll with real heart and soul.

I don’t give a damn what hits they had or where they charted.

When I need rock therapy. They give it to me.

They should be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

 

 

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Rockmes @ SPACE: Making the Kids Jump!

(Photos by Paul Barrosse, Suzy Crawford, Ronny Crawford, Richard Henzel, Mark Wohlgenant and Tom Kalicky)

From the band’s inception, the motto of Riffmaster & The Rockme Foundation has been “Make the kids jump!” We put that slogan on posters, t-shirts, record covers, and even on our own custom-painted Converse Chuck Taylor All-Stars back in the day. But on Monday night, May 17th at SPACE in Evanston, Illinois, “Make the kids jump” became more than a motto: it became a reality for a whole new generation of young rock & roll lovers. To see so many teenagers and young adults dancing so fervently that night in a garage music mosh pit was a vital, unexpected shot of Rockme renewal.

But I’m getting ahead of the story…

As I reported earlier, the far flung members of Riffmaster & The Rockme Foundation gathered in Evanston on Saturday, May 15 to rehearse for our gig at SPACE (the Society for Preservation of Art and Culture in Evanston) that Monday night. Our sax man, Thomas “The Iberian Wolf” Larson, who recently moved with his family to Madrid, traveled the farthest. Our keyboard whiz, Steve “The Decider” Rashid, who lives in Evanston, didn’t have to go anywhere at all. In fact, we were invading his studio, Woodside Avenue Music, for our rehearsal. Lucky Steve.

Bassist Rush Pearson came to the rehearsal equipped with set lists and color-coded index cards for each song we were thinking about playing. We gave Rush a lot of grief for his color code – guys in bands love busting each other’s balls – but everyone was secretly glad that someone was paying attention to the details. And, boy, was Rush on top of the details. He took the organizational bullet for all of us – and managed to survive. And thanks largely to Rusty and his index cards, we managed to arrive at just about the perfect number of songs for our two sets at SPACE. (Sorry, Emilia, but we couldn’t squeeze in “I Forgot”.)

After our long day of rehearsal at Woodside Studios, the band was invited to a party at the Evanston home of our Northwestern classmate, Katie Tabor and her husband Sam Fishkin, who’s also an NU alum.

One highlight of the Tabor party was a screening of “Max & Helena” a beautifully shot short film starring one of the band’s best buddies (and yes, another NU classmate) “Fat Dave” Silberger. The other highlight of the evening was meeting so many children of our Northwestern pals. At our age, many of our kids are well into their teens and, in some cases, they’re college age. They’ve grown into real people. Interesting people. It was a pleasure to see so many of them gathered in one happy place, enjoying each others’ company and making it seem as though they thought their parents’ old Rockme pals were interesting, too. (Little did we realize we’d just met the core of our Monday night mosh pit.)

On Sunday morning, the singers in the band met for a vocal rehearsal at Steve’s house. With Brad Hall strumming an acoustic guitar, Steve, Casey “Casemo” Fox, Brad and I worked through vocal arrangements for such Rockme classic as “I Fall in Love Everyday”, “Surf”, “I Wanna Be There”, and new Woodshed @ Woodside CD tunes like “Hitchin’ A Ride” and “Steve”. This sweet sounding, harmony-laden, easy-on-the-ears musical interlude inspired the idea that our next reunion should be “Rockme Unplugged”. With Riffmaster playing lead on a ukulele. (Just kidding. About Riff and the ukulele. We’re serious about the “Unplugged” idea.)

After vocal rehearsal, we took a trip to the Ukranian Village neighborhood on the west side of Chicago to meet he rest of the band at a rehearsal studio called Fabsound, owned and operated by an Eastern European native named Fabien. Fabien’s spare, cramped studio, built in the basement of his turn-of-the century house, reminded me of the basement room that the Romanovs were ushered into by the Bolsheviks. And a glance at how close I would be to Riffmaster’s amplifier in this confined space triggered fear that I was doomed as well. But, despite the fact that we left with our ears ringing, Fabsound turned out to be a fab place for us to focus on nailing our two sets down.

The band in the alley outside Fabsound after rehearsal.

Fabien and "Bubba" George McClellan snap the band in the alley.

Beefma & Wolf: The Tom Tom Horns

On the day of the gig, the vocalists met at Woodside Studios for a quick harmony brush-up before the whole band came together to rehearse a few songs with Tom “Beefma” Kalicky”, my old high school pal and bandmate, and a member of The Rockme Foundation back when the band was young.

We hadn’t played with Tom for years, but his familiar baritone saxophone was soon adding the big bottom to “Young Boys & Girls”, “Surf” and “Louie Louie” — just as it did in the days when all of us but the Riffmaster had a full head of hair.

Arriving at SPACE for our sound check we were greeted by our friend, fellow musician, bon vivant and impresario, Stuart Rosenberg, one of the SPACE partners. Stuart showed us around his magnificent facility, but there was little time to absorb it all. Melissa Etheridge had just performed a WXRT radio sponsored event in the room that afternoon, and we would have scant time for a sound check. We were soon on the stage, knocking out several tunes for the engineers at the soundboard before the doors opened at 7:30 for our 8:00 show.

That's my daughter Emilia on keys (at left).

At 8:00, the room was already getting packed when I got onstage to introduce our opening act – MORI and the Moonwalkers. It was a particularly moving moment for me because the keyboard player in the band is my own daughter, Emilia Barrosse – and, like Emilia, the entire band is made up of Northwestern students. As Mori Einsidler led her group through their tuneful, rocking 3-song set, it was a moment for Rockmes (and many Rockme fans) to reflect on our own roots as classmates and friends at Northwestern, and to appreciate how the next generation is carrying the music forward. The kids are still driven to pick up guitars and play – nearly 6 decades after Elvis electrified American youth, and 46 years after The Beatles came to our shores to shake up “The Ed Sullivan Show” and the nation’s entire social order in the process.

After “Bubba” George McClellan’s elaborate and inspired Dragnet-Peter Gunn influenced introduction, the Rockmes took the stage – and the rock and roll party was on! SPACE was jammed with hundreds of rocking revelers on a Monday night. It would be impossible to list all the great friends who came out to share the evening with us. The only frustration that night was not having the time to personally let each of them know much we appreciated that they came, they saw, they rocked. And paid the cover. In fact, it went so well at the box office that SPACE invited us back to play again next year.

Suzanne Plunkett and Bea Rashid on the dance floor. (Note the guy with the earplugs at left.)

Riffmaster Peter Van Wagner. (The main reason for that guy's earplugs.)

The best thing about our wonderful crowd was that they DANCED. There’s nothing that drives a rock and roll band to perform at its best than a happening dance floor – and SPACE was not so much a concert venue that night but a crowded, crazy, sock-hopping dance hall. And there were a lot of young people, high school and college students, filling out that dance floor.

The next generation was also at work off the dance floor. Our Rockme logistical coordinator, great friend, and, of course, fellow NU alum, Terry Barron, brought his teenage son, Taidgh, with him from New York to share the adventure. But enterprising young Taidgh was not content to just listen to the music – he sold the music: moving a remarkable number of “Rockme All Stars” and “Woodshed @ Woodside” CDs. Taidgh was recently named the Rockme Retail Merchandising Coordinator. I tell ya, that kid is going places!

Back on the dance floor, the greatest moment for me, and for entire band, came late in the second set – when we realized that the large group of young people that commanded the first few rows on the floor were getting more and more into it with each song, passionately singing along with me every time I jumped off the stage and offered them the microphone. The kids sang just about as much of “I Saw Her Standing There” as I did.

Then, at one incandescent moment, the kids all started jumping up and down in a simple but dynamic dance that we who remember the late 70’s punk rock scene would call “pogo-ing”. The kids were, quite literally, jumping! Eureka! We had made the kids jump – and thus honored our motto.

There could not have been a better way to end a memorable weekend of friendship, nostalgia, family, and rock and roll renewal.

See you all back at SPACE next year.

Mark Wohlgenant's Rockme SPACE collage.

And stay tuned for more news about “Rockme Unplugged” and our grand plans for the “Rockme Iberian Tour.” How do you say, Make the kids jump” in Spanish?

A shot from Richard Henzel's perspective.

The Tom Tom Horns. Gotta love Beefma's pink Stetson.

Rockin' Ronny Crawford: the beating heart of the Rockme Foundation.

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Rockme Reunion Reminder

I’ve revised this classic Rockme poster by Gary Whitney (circa 1982) to remind everyone within reach of Evanston, Illinois by rocket car that Riffmaster & the Rockme Foundation will be playing a reunion gig at SPACE in Evanston on May 17th. We haven’t made the kids jump in Evanston for over two decades, so it’s about time we showed the rock-hungry youngsters of Northwestern University what the finest in traditional and original American garage music sounds like. Hope to see you there!

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