A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall…

R-2057737-1261406197.jpegWe modern, sophisticated, educated folk tend to dismiss the idea of prophets: people who can see the future and comment on what’s coming.

But give a listen to this song by Bob Dylan – who was just 22-years old when “A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall” was released on May 27, 1963 — on the album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

Freewheelin’? Not on this song.

Bob Dylan may well be the greatest poet writing in the English language since Shakespeare. Listen to his song – and read the lyrics. I will say no more.

Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son
And where have you been, my darling young one
I’ve stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains
I’ve walked and I’ve crawled on six crooked highways
I’ve stepped in the middle of seven sad forests
I’ve been out in front of a dozen dead oceans
I’ve been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall

Oh, what did you see, my blue-eyed son
And what did you see, my darling young one
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin’
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin’
I saw a white ladder all covered with water
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall

And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder that roared out a warnin’
Heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world
Heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin’
Heard ten thousand whisperin’ and nobody listenin’
Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin’
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall

Oh, what did you meet, my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony
I met a white man who walked a black dog
I met a young woman whose body was burning
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow
I met one man who was wounded in love
I met another man who was wounded with hatred
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall

And what’ll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
And what’ll you do now, my darling young one?
I’m a-goin’ back out ‘fore the rain starts a-fallin’
I’ll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest
Where the people are many and their hands are all empty
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison
And the executioner’s face is always well hidden
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten
Where black is the color, where none is the number
And I’ll tell it and think it and speak it and breathe it
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it
Then I’ll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin’
But I’ll know my song well before I start singin’
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Recall these lines – and think about them. This was a young man, barely an adult in the early 1960’s, and he saw – and sang about – these images…

I’ve been out in front of a dozen dead oceans

I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children

Heard ten thousand whisperin’ and nobody listenin’

Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin’

I met a white man who walked a black dog

I met a young woman whose body was burning

Where the people are many and their hands are all empty

Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters

Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison

Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten

Where black is the color, where none is the number

How could such a young man see the future (and his present) so clearly?

Now, tell me there’s no such thing as prophecy…

 

 

10 Comments

Filed under Art, Beauty, History, Music, Politics, rock & roll, Uncategorized

10 responses to “A Hard Rain’s Gonna Fall…

  1. lee van dyke

    Nobel Prize for a reason. Thanks for the reminder about the language of the song.

  2. Terri

    They fear the youth they want to shut them down. I finially have a spark of hope. This is their world now. Youth brings energy and unbridled enthusiasm with no thought they they will fail. I love the youth. They bring me to life. Would I encourage my young people to stand up and take on this cause? Of course I would. This is thier world. They want change. If we dig back into our bagage from our lives in the sixties we will find those same young people who wanted change. Let our voices blend with thiers now and bring about change.

  3. Greatest poet since Shakespeare? That’s a big stretch. Yeats’ “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” or Eliot’s “The Waste Land” would cut that boast. Dylan was certainly prescient, but we need to remember the context. He wrote that soon after the Cuban Missile Crisis. Rachel Carson’s “Silent Spring” had already been published. Though I couldn’t have written “Hard Rain,” at the age of 12 in 1969, I very much felt that the world was changing inalterably, and environmental degradation was our future. Dylan’s cynicism is quite sharp, and when it is heard with his plosive rhythms, it is profound. The song that kills me is “Masters of War” written before our full engagement of Vietnam, and every time I hear it, I think of Dick Cheney.

    • Of course, you are correct on all your points, Darroch. Nobody can be compared to Shakespeare. But Dylan represents a great leap for songwriting and inspired a generation of artists to think beyond the Brill Building. And yes, “Masters of War” is a masterpiece.

  4. Ben

    It’s amazing how much power he yields with just his voice, his words and guitar.

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